Archive for the ‘C#’ Category

Tutorial penggunaan SQLite dari .NET menggunakan bahasa C#

2007 June 11

This post has been moved to singularity.agronesia.net: “Tutorial penggunaan SQLite dari .NET menggunakan bahasa C#”. Please visit the new server.

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SQLite, mesin SQL yang kecil dan cepat

2007 May 29

Tulisan ini telah dipindah ke singularity.agronesia.net: “SQLite, mesin SQL yang kecil dan cepat”. Silahkan kunjungi server barunya.

This post has been moved to singularity.agronesia.net: “SQLite, mesin SQL yang kecil dan cepat”. Please visit the new server.

HtmlKanjiMarker 0.01

2007 February 23

The first release of HtmlKanjiMarker 🙂

HtmlKanjiMarker is a program that reads a local HTML file and then marks all unknown kanji red. If you’re studying kanji, this program might be interesting and useful.

Because the program is written in C#, you first need to install .NET Framework 2.0. After that you can download HtmlKanjiMarker 0.01 (487 KB) itself. To run the program, just extract the contents somewhere and run “HtmlKanjiMarker.exe”. Instruction on using the program can be found on the included “readme.txt”

PS: If my university server borks, you can try downloading from http://www.sendspace.com/file/p8n6sj

PS2: The program doesn’t run yet on Mono 1.2.3 because they haven’t implemented the web browser control.

HtmlKanjiMarker: my red grades

2007 February 17

HtmlKanjiMarker

This program was actually made quite some time ago, but I haven’t blogged about it.

HtmlKanjiMarker reads a local HTML file and then marks all unknown kanji red. The list of known kanji is taken from two sources. First is from the “Max grade” textbox on the upper right. I entered 4 because I’ve studied all Jouyou kanji grade 4 and below. The second is from a text file, “ExtraKnownKanji.txt”. The file should contain all kanji you’ve learned, outside from the textbox range.

Using this program, I can visually see how effective my current kanji knowledge is for a certain page. It also makes hunting new kanji easy. Last, It can answer questions such as “what if I learn all grade 5 kanji?”. (just change the “Max grade” textbox)

Programming the algorithm naively yielded a very slow marking. This is because a HTML page contains tons of characters, and there are ten thousands of kanji to check againts. I actually benchmarked and overhauled the algorithm several times. I originally wanted to write about the algorithm changes, but lost the interest by now :).

So, here’s some generated Wikipedia pages viewed from my eyes of 1249 kanji: Newton, September 11 2001 attacks, Wikipedia. Rest assured, I’m still quite far for literacy…

Keep running, and if tired, walking. A small rest is also fine, just don’t surrender!